ACOG vs EOTECH With Magnifier

ACOG Vs EOTECH With Magnifier

In the world of combat sights and general sporting-use tools, there are two sighting systems that tend to make for a good discussion among shooters whenever the subject comes up. 

The question here is direct and simple. Which sighting system is better when it comes to selecting the ACOG sight versus the Eotech sighting system?

In reality, both sights are designed for the same purpose, which is military applications, and also both sights have seen many hours of service in the middle eastern war. 

ACOG

acog magnification

First off, let's start with the ACOG rifle sight. 

This sight was designed expressly for use on the M-16/M-4-class 5.56 (.223 Rem ) assault rifle. The sight carries sub-tensions that make up a center red eliminated chevron, followed by a series of elevation correction hash-marks numbering exact range when factored to the .556 NATO round.

This is a point-and-shoot system whereby you select the range, center the target and touch off a round. Training the ACOG is field-dirt simple in that after a basic zeroing, using two adjustment knobs, the sight is field-ready. 

The ACOG rifle sight uses active tritium (radioactive) and never needs a new battery or recharging. I have kept a hand rifle with this sight in a dark case for months and, when removed, it is as bright red as day through the viewer. 

acog magnifier

The sight magnifies to 4X and has a fixed power setting that is applied to the ballistics of the .556 NATO once again. Built around this cartridge, the sight is a very simple system to train, maintain and operate.

The ACOG is built with its own picatinny rail-mount, and is on or off the rifle in seconds, if required. 

In terms of practical field applications, I shoot this sight on a regular basis, as applied to a Smith & Wesson M&P-T .223 Remington. I have taken coyotes at 300 yards using the built-in hash-mark ranging system with one clean shot. 

I have also shot open country trophy turkeys in significant numbers with the rifle using a down-loaded hand-load for the job, and then reprinted (memory ) my hash-marks for the new range settings required of a special slower velocity bullet.

acog vs eotech with magnifier

In effect, the ACOG is a class act in sighting systems. It is flexible and trouble-free 100 percent of the time, and super easy to use. Drawbacks to the system are absolutely none. 

My own personal sight was a rebuild obtained for testing direct from the manufacturer. It has been damaged in actual combat, returned to the manufacturer and rebuilt. I have not touched it for any service in over a decade. If it is looking like I favor the ACOG, you are correct in that assumption to be sure. 

Trijicon ACOG

Available at Amazon

The price of ACOG varies, so check the latest price at Amazon.

Eotech

eotech holographic sight with magnifier

Secondly, the subject turns to the Eotech rifle sight. As previously indicated, this is also a military-designed and US Army-used sight. It is a zero power red dot and, when paired with a magnifier system, can generate power settings to 4X. In effect, a red dot with magnification. 

This sight makes use of a small battery for a power source. These are long-lasting and power-down when not in use. The sight uses the red dot center point and has no additional markings within the reticle. When judging range you're on your own with no assistance whatsoever. 

eotech scope with magnifier

Shooting a sample of this system as provided by the manufacturer, I found it to work well at close-range, but it failed at longer-ranges, when applied to whitetail deer. The hunt was in heavy standing corn and shots were fast. But this was an asset in terms of using the Eotech sight. 

The sight was fast to mount and center on a target. However, as this was a culling operation and we were shooting deer by the numbers, the longer shots on the outside of the corn field were just not in the deal. 

eotech magnifier

The red dot got lost much of the time lacking the magnification add-on G33 system that is included in this discussion. 

With a G33 or similar system, yes the red dot sight becomes more flexible. But the added weight is a factor. As well as carrying bulk in tight shooting situations, speed also counts for a whole lot in terms of winning a fight or taking a big game animal. 

EOTECH HHS

Available at Amazon

The price of Eotech  varies, so check the latest price at Amazon.

Value for money?

In terms of pricing and what you're getting for your money, the ACOG and the Eotech are close to the same price if you consider the secondary price of the magnifier required to bring up the red dot to a 4X magnification level. 

acog holographic sight

ACOG as sold through Amazon is a Trijicom ACOG 4X32 Scope, the system is .223 ballistics reticle installed, and the sighting color is red. 

The housing is aluminum alloy forged from 7075-T6 aircraft aluminum. The sight works as a both-eyes-open system, so important in combat or any defense situation.

This sight uses the “Bindon Aiming Concept” (BAC), and it has a Bullet Drop Compensator (BDC) that is accurate to 600 meters without using any external adjustments whatsoever. 

The sight is mounted on a picatinny rail attachment system and ties onto the rail using two heavy bolt-on points. This system by Trijicon is considered one of the best battle sights in the world today.

The second sight is the Eotech HHS Holographic Hybrid Sight-EXPS2-2 with G33 Magnifier. This sight is a heads-up holo display sight and, as such, retains a window that displays the red dot image against the glass,

The sight is fully adjustable for windage and elevation during zeroing, but set-up as a fixed system when in use on targets.

Which is best?

So, Eotech vs ACOG, which system is best? That depends on the shooter and what he or she is searching for in a gun sight. 

If I am hunting with lights at night I will opt for the HUD display, as in the Eotech system. However, if I am shooting deer at long-range, or sitting on a coyote stand, the ACOG is by far the better choice for my needs. 

Does that mean either sight is wrong? No, not at all. Personal preference is the major denominator in this case. As for price, with the complete package regarding both sights, it's almost a wash. 

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